Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty
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615-256-3906
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P.O. Box 120552
Nashville, TN 37212
Organization Details

Programs

Budget
$5,500.00
Description
High school and college students from across the state gather at a college or university to attend the annual Student Conference on the Death Penalty. During this day-long conference, students hear from those directly impacted by the death penalty system and receive training on how to educate students and faculty on their respective campuses.
Program Areas Served
None
Budget
$3,500.00
Description
TADP has developed several workshops designed to educate and empower citizens with the basic tools to organize themselves and advocate for their own interests. The training workshops include public speaking and citizen advocacy.
Program Areas Served
None
Budget
$45,000.00
Description
Conservatives in Tennessee are taking a stand to re-evaluate the current capital punishment system. Polls show that national support for the death penalty has steadily decreased over the past two decades and has reached a 40-year low, even among conservatives who have traditionally been strong proponents of capital punishment. Our state continues to spend millions of dollars a year on an unpopular punishment that has been used 11 times since 1960. The 2004 Tennessee Comptroller's "Tennessee's Death Penalty: Costs and Consequences" report revealed that death penalty trials cost an average of 48 percent more than the average cost of trials in which prosecutors seek life imprisonment. The death penalty fails at both efficiency and results. Tennessee Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty (TNCC) provides a platform for Tennessee conservatives to question this system marked by inefficiency, inequity, and inaccuracy and to educate other conservatives statewide about this failed policy that doesn't make us safer, risks executing the innocent, and is wasteful and expensive.
Program Areas Served
None
Budget
$30,000.00
Description
Through a community organizer, this initiative will educate and create awareness about the impact of the criminal justice system in Shelby County, and, as part of a collaboration with Just City, will serve as the primary vehicle for TADP in Memphis. This collaborative work will support Just City and TADP in achieving their common goals of reducing the size, scope, and disparate treatment within the criminal justice system.
Program Areas Served
None
Budget
$20,000.00
Description
Sharing Our Stories is an innovative program pairing TADP staff with surviving family members of murder victims, death row exonerees, corrections officials, and families of the executed to provide presentations to faith communities, schools, and organizations. This program allows those most directly impacted by this policy to share their stories about the broken death penalty system. TADP empowers these individuals through speaking engagements and events specifically organized to offer support to those who have been directly impacted by the death penalty.
Program Areas Served
None
Budget
$25,000.00
Description
Working with the TASMIE coalition, TADP educates Tennesseans about the human and financial costs of pursuing the death penalty for those who have severe mental illness and why these individuals should not be eligible for a death sentence. Recognizing the need for public safety, life without parole would still be an option for these violent offenders, but with death off the table, victims' families will be provided legal finality much sooner, and the state will save millions of dollars that can be used for mental health treatment, compensation for victims' families, and additional resources for law enforcement.
Program Areas Served
None

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Across the country, the death penalty is falling out of use. As more voices join this conversation, including political conservatives, members of corrections, murder victims' families, death row exonerees, and law enforcement, more citizens are learning of the failures and risks of this antiquated system. Since 2007, nine states have repealed the death penalty with 21 states now in the repeal category. Another four states have moratoria on executions. Unfortunately, even as the nation is moving away from the use of the death penalty, Tennessee has resumed executions with the execution of Billy Ray Irick on August 9, 2018. The state has executed four more individuals since Mr. Irick. However, rather than diminishing citizens' concerns about the death penalty, the state's recent executions only amplified them. More and more Tennesseans are recognizing the system's flaws, including its exorbitant cost, the risk of executing an innocent person, and the toll the decadeslong process takes on victims families. Now, more than ever, is the time to get involved with TADP's work and to help us make history by educating Tennesseans about why our state does not need the death penalty.